• US High Schools Just Don’t Understand Politics

    The results of the 2016 National Assessment of Educational Progress show that nearly 75% of all high school schools fail to understand how the US government works. Compared to the results of a similar study conducted five years ago, test scores fell by 3%. Students were asked questions related to the three branches of government […]

  • High Standards Call for Strong Home-School Partnerships

    Children’s lives are shaped by the web of relationships in their environments. In our capacities as school leaders, teachers, and parents, we are entrusted with the formidable responsibility of guiding, nurturing, supporting, and teaching our young. As the significant people who help children to make sense of their world, one of our primary tasks is […]

  • Teacher brings true diversity to his classroom

    Coach John Wooden reminds us, “The best teachers never retire they only find new students.” Many teachers find the rewards of teaching go beyond the classroom. This case study includes several of the 20 educators selected in 2001 to represent the All-USA Teacher Team, an elite group of educators with diverse teaching styles. Each has […]

  • General studies can pay off over highly specific curricula

    Kristin McQuillan primarily chose the University of the Pacific for a pilot program in which she could earn both a pharmacy degree and a master’s of business administration in six years. But in her first semester last year on the Stockton, Calif., campus, she found herself far more enthusiastic about her economics and public speaking […]

  • Different paths lead to a degree

    Many students get part-time jobs, take longer than 4 years to finish Entering Michigan State University as a freshman, Joseph Montes assumed he would complete his degree in four years. Two majors, multiple part-time jobs, and three internships later, the 22-year-old, fifth-year senior from Lake Orion, Mich., isn’t necessarily disappointed that it didn’t turn out that […]